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McTimoney Chiropractic in Peterborough 2 January 2015

Posted by davidghallam in back pain, frequently asked questions, headaches, migraine, sciatica, shoulder pain.
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chiropractor with spine model

What is McTimoney Chiropractic?

McTimoney chiropractic is a gentle style of chiropractic that uses light, fast movements to adjust the bones of the body. It aims to improve the alignment of the skeleton and ensure that the body’s nerve supply works efficiently. Through subtle adjustments, McTimoney treatment may relieve pain and discomfort, increase mobility and provide a route to better health.

Can McTimoney help me?

The gentle nature of McTimoney makes it suitable for people of all ages including young children, pregnant women and the elderly. Studies have shown that chiropractic can be helpful for a range of conditions including low back pain, neck pain and joint pain, migraine and cervicogenic headaches.

How is McTimoney different?

Rather than relying on a few ‘big’ moves, the McTimoney method aims to address the whole body and achieves its effects by an accumulation of many small adjustments. The McTimoney chiropractor aims to check and, if necessary, adjust almost every joint in the skeleton at every visit. There is no twisting of the body into uncomfortable positions and no ‘gapping’ of the joints. People are often surprised to find an effective treatment that is so relaxing and enjoyable.

Is this just a ‘gentle treatment for gentle folk’?

Despite its gentle approach, McTimoney can be effective for all sorts of problems. Builders, labourers and others engaged in heavy manual work have benefitted from treatment at the Peterborough clinic; along with football and rugby players and others engaged in arduous sports.

Appointments

£51 for the first visit (60 minutes – including consultation and treatment), £41 for subsequent visits (20 minutes). Typically, the chiropractor will recommend weekly visits for the first four  appointments. Many people will see real changes and improvements in those four visits, others will need more. The total number of visits required will depend on the condition, how long you have had it and how you respond to the treatment. Regular reviews are conducted to ensure that you are getting the maximum benefit possible. Once a problem has been resolved, regular check-ups are recommended to help keep your spine and other joints functioning properly. You are free to stop or resume treatment at any time.

The Chiropractor

Peterborough man David Hallam is a 2004 graduate of the Chiropractic Degree Course at the McTimoney Chiropractic College in Abingdon, Oxfordshire. He is registered with the General Chiropractic Council and undertakes regular professional development training to keep his skills and practice up-to-date. He also holds qualifications in massage and sports massage.

Migraine and chiropractic 7 July 2009

Posted by davidghallam in headaches, migraine, research.
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Migraines are painful headaches accompanied by a variety of symptoms such as visual disturbances, sensitivity to light, sound and smells, nausea and vomiting. Migraine attacks may vary in length and frequency: usually lasting from 4 to 72 hours, with most people free of symptoms between attacks.

‘Classic migraines’ are those accompanied by aura symptoms – neurological signs such as visual disturbance, numbness or tingling, dizziness, speech and hearing defects. Some people report memory changes, and feelings of fear and confusion. Other migraines are referred to as ‘common migraines’.

When taking a patient’s history, the chiropractor will be careful to distinguish migraines from other forms of recurring headache such as tension, sinus, eyestrain and cluster headaches.

Chiropractic an effective form of treatment
Most chiropractors approach patients suffering from migraine headaches with confidence because of the beneficial response of previous patients, who often report that chiropractic has given better relief from migraine than other forms of treatment.

Migraine triggers
Precisely how chiropractic may be helping these patients is not yet clear: much research still needs to be done. Migraine is a complex condition whose causes are not yet properly understood by medical science. Different factors are responsible for triggering migraines in different people: eg, stress, bright light, menstruation, hunger, cheese, chocolate, and monosodium glutamate.

Cervical (neck joint) triggers
It has been suggested (Terrett, 2004) that one triggering factor in some patients may be dysfunction in the joints of the cervical spine and/or muscle dysfunction in the neck region (what chiropractors call ‘subluxations’). Chiropractic adjustments can relieve these joint and muscle dysfunctions and thus remove this possible triggering factor in susceptible patients.

Chiropractic research
Four notable research projects have shown that chiropractic care can be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches.

The Wight Migraine Study
87 patients with classic or common migraine received chiropractic treatment over a two-year period. At the end of the two years they were assessed by means of a headache questionnaire. 29 of the 87 subjects (33%) reported a complete cessation of headaches. A further 36 (41%) reported that their headaches were much improved.

The Parker Migraine Study
A randomised controlled trial of 85 migraine sufferers who were treated by chiropractic manipulation, medical manipulation, or physiotherapy mobilisation. The subjects were treated an average of 7 times. The frequency of headache was reduced by 40% in the chiropractic group, 13% in the medical group and 34% in the physiotherapy group. Only the reduction in the chiropractic group achieved statistical significance.

The Stodolny and Chmielewski Study
A study conducted in a Neurology department in Poland of 31 patients with a diagnosis of cervical migraine. All of the patients demonstrated restrictions in neck rotation before the study commenced. After manual treatment, headaches disappeared in 32.3% of the patients. The authors concluded that functional joint restriction in the upper cervical spine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical migraine and elimination of those joint restrictions significantly reduces the intensity of migraine symptoms.

The Tuchin Study
A randomised controlled trial conducted on 123 volunteers aged 10 to 70 years. A diagnosis of migraine was made according to the International Headache Society standard. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 2 months of chiropractic treatment or 2 months of ‘placebo’ treatment. Analysis showed a statistically significant improvement in migraine frequency, duration, disability and medication in the chiropractic group when compared to the placebo group. 22% of the chiropractic patients reported more than a 90% reduction in migraines as a result of the 2 months of treatment.

References
The above notes draw heavily on the article ‘Is upper cervical subluxation a triggering mechanism in some migraine susceptible patients?’ by Allan Terrett, Associate Professor at the School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Australia, published in ‘The Cheiron’ Magazine, Winter 2004.

Wight JS. Migraine: a statistical analysis of chiropractic treatment. ACA J Chiropractic 1978 (Sep); 15 (9): S63-67.

Parker GB, Tupling H, Pryor DS. A controlled trial of cervical manipulation for migraine. Aust NZ J Med 1978; 8; 589-593.

Stodolny J, Chmielewski H. Manual therapy in the treatment of patients with cervical migraine. Manual Med 1989; 4; 49-51.

Tuchin PJ, Pollard H, Bonello R. A randomised controlled trial of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for migraine. J Manip Physiol Ther 2000 (Feb); 23 (2); 91-5.